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Full text of "Political Science Of The State"

•                                                         U if"l T

POLITICAL   CIlA>'t;1>'

.    t        ,                   i It i« pruh.ihU* thai thc

of disquiet have been remove^        l          ,          ...

ui      i                  ^                       CAn Wt, drnv cither

ionary age is passing a\vay.   *        ,,   •         \

iuuaij   b        i         t>         y   ,, imrvMUts havt* been to

its necessity, as we look back, or tlw1 1

a considerable degree good.                              ,        .     ,itY        f

...            t   ,;.,,i his MUCH  111 UUU.KTUl

The different course which rcvoluti1"1 4   .                    .

11                      ...      4       ...^character ami spir-

.   ,  ,       countries is clue to nauul1              t         .      '

ational charac-      ......                    , i               A.         »»    *»*"'    *'"«

.   ,  ,                                                              t         .

National charac-      ......                   , i   r;uWA.         »»    *»*">'

ter   as   influcncui};   cull   historical    Or   SOCIiU  ^            .     »             M

the course of revolu-                                                            ^   nf   ^}u:   HO,J     So   ^,

t10115-                 country did it o;row up            .     .           '

-    11   ,1       *t        •    •  i      ,f fr»:c thinking, thc ct«.n>
speak; in all others thc principles ot "*-              ?

.      r i             • T,         i *i     i ,vuu  f*»r political ix'h»nn

trine of human rights, and the detfl'ulu      . • .   .,                 ,

,  ,      V                  i   i i,/ thoi social inilttonccs and

were imported, and recommended by1"        . ,   .    .         11M

r  i -       •     1            ^        1-1          -i.  firnt><?P htrthplacc.   \V hy

fashions in the country which was its J>1(\            * .               *

•    i   . .   i-           4i            i           ,fnlutn»nary spint art^c ?

was it that in trance the modern rcvf(>luu        ' . *       . .   .
„„           .. ,1   ,     c.             ,      . „!.* ytjars, Uus spirit bus

Why was it that, after  nearly ninety >    r \   ,

destroyed so much in order to constt*act M>       \"
rp,     .      f ..           ,  ..              . ... :,i Vraiice is due to strv-

The rise of the revolutionary spirit 1U       .     .         .         -

1                    r\        f tin'SC is  that when   tho

Revolution-irv <ni-   crftl   CJIUSCS-         OllC   of   IU                                 •

^ p

-                                                 ,     ,      .                 •
u   t *.-        ri     •   v i\r had dcsin»yod ancient
absolutusm of Lotus XI v'        ,       t  '     .
.   ...  ..              ,      ,, .       .    ..   .   rtiMce* that thus the LJOV*
institutions, it put nothing in their pi*1^'*             .   v»r
. u                   ii-i      ,.ni'thU:ss Lotus XV., antl
ernment became weak under the -\vfl*ul
, ,  , , ,    i  -ir    ,    ..      i                  , trrench society were wnv
that the brilliant wits who governed* r        .  t       ^-       . .  ,
M   *.   1             1 1-   *i        i *,   • t  .i,/" orinciples of free think*
able to leaven public thought with thc F1*"   *              ...
*    A    ..I            * 1     f-     .   t    *ikcft nito account is that
mg.*   Another consideration to be t*H^u *                             *
,,   £       . .       ,           r .*              ^itiiit, not lon^ before the
the financial weakness of the govern**1**   '            ?,    ,
outbreak of thc revolution, rendered it ^ W'M* U>
any movement which miijht arise svitl"11 the c»untry.
example from abroad-our revolution^ ^"M^ m w "ch w«
T ^ , ,t              .,         1    • i    f i.      /.c— irrcatly corroborated
had the sympathy and aid of Fruncc    to    .        /.         ,
fi A     ,.,.   ,      .    . .          ,  .          ^/4 lonqrmes for a belter
the political principles and  mcru»a*ca ,   r? . ..    *  ,    T
^   ...  ..           ill     TVT    .       tieu s Spint of the Laws,
constitution awakened by MontescU*1          *     T      . .           *
and animated by Rousseau's social  contract.    It miRht scc.n
strange that abuses coming duwn  ft°m ^ k^ "y"lcm
-Mrpi . ,   i       , ,   , ,    .-                 „ ^^nortjmt auxiliary cause *
ought to be added to these as au itf1*-.   -.. , ,.    .     7     .   t '
Kt,f ^   T-           -n   i             1 1.       -    his Old Regime and the
but de Tocqueville has taught us, in * „          3   ^     .      ,
p^^i 4.-      1.1   i. T-      1  i-r               ^mn^ under the burdens
Kevolution, that trench life was nr^ lu *»                         ;•"*
An fi,^ i    i       i       .1                .       -tiich this defunct uistitu-
on the land and on the peasantry v
* Guuot, Civ, in Kr.;